The Week on Sunday (weekly)

  • Sometimes you can’t help but be sickened by the behavior of certain international organizations helping Haiti recover from the devastating January 2010 earthquake–hit, that is, by a wave of real physical nausea. The other day, I spent an afternoon in the displaced persons camp across from the ruins of St. Anne’s church in downtown Port-au-Prince. The place was awful, as awful as you can imagine squalid emergency living quarters might be–homes consisting of tent, tarp, tin, sheets, plywood, some cardboard–after three years of dust, dirt, sewage, torrential storms and, to top it off, Hurricane Sandy, which killed at least fifty-four people in Haiti.

    tags: haiti

  • What is the exact number of lodgings to be built? What is the total budget? When will the construction be completed? Under what conditions was the contract signed, and by whom? What firm is executing the project, and what firm is overseeing the project? Does the project fit with the government’s new housing policy? Who is or are the landowner(s) and how much money did he or they receive?

    Are the houses meant to be “public” housing for the victims of the January 2010 earthquake?

    tags: haiti grassroots Housing SweatShops

  • The current law for minimum wage in Haiti sweatshops is between 200 and 300 Gourdes (4.75 US to 7.12 US) per day. That paltry amount has not been met. Why? Segue to the under-reported and ignored 2011 scandal involving Obama administration pressure to keep the minimum wage even lower at 31 cents per hour so that jeans and t-shirts would stay cheap and the answer becomes clear.

    The Source Photo by Georgianne Nienaber
    A family in Haiti requires at least $12 a day to survive. Do the math. 300 farmers displaced by a Korean sweat shop, massive food insecurities, a hurricane shreds the curtain shielding the wizards of disaster capitalism, and no one notices.

    tags: Haitian+Women

  • Suggested readings on Haiti – though does not include “Haiti-Haitii: Philosophical Reflections for Mental Decolonization” by Jean Bertrand Aristide -

    tags: Haiti Aristide Books

  • By promoting gay rights as the endpoint of human rights, Israel obscures not only its obliteration of Palestine, but simultaneously silences queer voices who argue that their liberation is always already bound up with the liberation from any form of oppression. Palestinian and international (queer) activists argue that to achieve a radical equality queer politics has to be intrinsically anti-racist, anti-occupation, anti-sexist, and anti-classist.In this panel, different speakers will talk about pinkwashing, queer politics, and Palestinian liberation. In conjunction, they will share their views on the use of sexuality in a larger context of Islamophobia, imperialism, neoliberalism, globalization, and settler-colonialism.

    tags: PinkWashing QueerPolitics Queer_Activism Palestine Israel

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