Chevron’s dirty tricks

chevwronglogotagversion2

How far will oil companies go to hide their dirty deeds? What did Chevron when they learned CBS 60 Minutes was making a documentary about their contamination of the Ecuador rainforest? They hired a journalist to make a “mirror” film but one which would put “their side of the story” but is actually presented as a piece of investigative journalism.

Mitch Anderson, a campaigner for Amazon Watch, said that Chevron had resorted to “embarrassing public relations tactics” because credible news sources had not sufficiently framed the report the way they would like, namely, to “to place all of the blame for Texaco’s environmental disaster in Ecuador on PetroEcuador,” Texaco’s former partner.

Mr. Randall’s video acknowledges the claims of the plaintiffs many times, primarily to set up Chevron’s response. “This is not a news report,” he said in an interview. “This is a client hiring a provider to tell its side of the story.” The video ends with a voiceover saying “Gene Randall reporting.”

Continue reading “When Chevron Hires Ex-Reporter to Investigate Pollution, Chevron Looks Good